What to do with writing scraps

As writers, we often write things that sound great in our head and fall flat on the page. It doesn’t mean these pieces are worn out socks that we should thank and toss. Instead, given the proper atmosphere or editing that piece can turn into a sparkly bundle of joy. Here’s how to save those lovely scraps.

If you’ve been anywhere on the internet or Netflix in the last few years, you’ve probably heard of Marie Kondo and The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. If you haven’t, Marie Kondo is an organizational consultant and expert as well as the founder of KonMari, a lifestyle brand. There are many facets to the KonMari Method™ of tidying up, however the premise is to only keep items that “spark joy” to promote a more mindful and peaceful lifestyle. 

The simple premise is so effective, it’s been applied to almost every industry including phone apps, food, and work spaces

Now I know what you’re thinking: this is going to be a post about applying the KonMari Method™ to writing. Good guess! However, today I’m heading the opposite direction. While I’ve read the The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and could dedicate a whole post to how shedding the excess has enhanced my personal life, I feel the opposite about writing. I don’t believe in getting rid of writing that doesn’t “spark joy”. 

Instead, I adhere to the write often and keep everything philosophy. As writers, we often write things that sound great in our head and fall flat on the page. It doesn’t mean these pieces are worn out socks that we should thank and toss. Instead, given the proper atmosphere or editing that piece can turn into a sparkly bundle of joy. 

So instead of deleting or shedding writing that doesn’t serve, try keeping it. Here are three ways to use your writing scraps. 

Add it to your story with a footnote

Write something that includes characters, settings, or plot points for a project you’re already working on? But not sure where in the timeline it fits? Or even if it fits at all? Instead of scrapping it, insert the piece into your project and include a footnote, highlight, different font color, comment–anything to distinguish that’s a TBD piece. Later, as you’re working through your editing phase you can decide if it stays, goes, or can be repurposed elsewhere. 

Bonus tip: if you’re working on Scrivener, you can always add the piece as a new document and then make a note in the title or on the corkboard that it’s TBD. 

Establish a Save for Later notebook

Like a good set of tupperware, consider creating a Save for Later or SFL notebook. This can be a paper or digital notebook–any place that can store a large amount of writing and is easily accessible. You can even get fancy and add tabs or sections to organize it by project, characters, setting, etc. Next time you’re looking for inspiration or that one sentence of dialogue is too good to leave behind, pull out your SFL notebook. 

Have a leftover night

Put that baked ziti away–I’m talking about word leftovers. Next time you’re staring at a blank page and not sure what to write, pull out your SFL notebook or other writing scraps and whip up a new recipe. Mix-and-match different scraps to create a new story; add something unexpected to a piece that’s flat; maybe edit and reheat something that’s almost there but not quite. It’s amazing how a little rearranging can bring a new dish…story to life. 

Have a collection of scraps and ready to dive into using them? Check out the Edit section for advice on revising and polishing. Go get your sparkle on.

KonMari Method™ is a trademark of KonMari Media Inc.

Scrivener: a review

Scrivener. It’s like the Evernote of word document systems; everything you need in one place. But is it worth the hype?

If you’ve been around the writing block you might have heard about Scrivener. It’s like the Evernote of word document systems; everything you need in one place. Including room for research notes, character sketches, place descriptions, and the ability to export your work in a single document.

In general, Scrivener receives great reviews for price, effectiveness, and user friendliness. But is it worth the hype? Let’s find out…

Who: 

Scrivener. Owned by the software company Literature & Latte. (A name after my own heart.) 

What: 

A software tool for writing projects. Used by writers and researchers across the board to organize and manage projects. This is a proprietary software license. I.e., you purchase a license and download the software to your device. It’s not cloud-based and you can’t access it from devices that don’t have the application installed. 

Where to buy:

Literature & Latte website

Pros 

Cons

  • You may need to download and purchase a software license if you plan to use across multiple devices. For instance, I purchased one license for my laptop and then purchased the Scrivener app for my phone.
    • N.B., in order to get the individual applications to sync (i.e., get Scrivener on your phone to sync with Scrivener on your laptop) you must set up a Dropbox account and link them. Scrivener provides detailed instructions for this.
  • If you want to sync large files or multiple projects, you may need to purchase additional space on Dropbox which is a subscription service.
  • You’ll need to back up your files on a cloud storage system or external hard drive
  • Functionality can feel confusing and overwhelming as there are a myriad of features and customization options

My take: 

Worth it. 100% worth it. I was on the fence about purchasing the software and was only tempted when I saw it highlighted as a featured product during NaNoWriMo last year. I had a system in Google Docs and it worked well enough. Not great, but no major complaints either.

So I downloaded the 30-Day trial to give it a spin (all the other cool writers were doing it) and fell in love. Switching over has vastly improved my organization. I no longer have loose or lost documents floating around Google Drive. Everything is in a tidy and compact binder where I can see exactly how the story unfolds and move chapters around as needed. Which is fantastic as I sometimes write something without knowing where it fits in the story’s timeline. Now I have the freedom to write and reorganize later. It’s also easier to keep track of multiple revisions and compare them side-by-side.

My only complaint about Scrivener is that it’s not inherently cloud-based. If I could access my Scrivener account from any device, anywhere that would be great. It would also give me peace of mind that my work is backed up. Even so, the Dropbox workaround works and I’m happy with the purchase.

If you’re serious about your writing or want to become serious about your writing, consider investing in Scrivener. 

Bonus tips

  1. You can download Scrivener for a 30-Day trial if you’re on the fence.
  2. Can’t figure out how to do something? Google it! There are thousands of videos, guides, and blog posts out there about Scrivener.
  3. Post update! Please see comments below, there are other ways to back your Scrivener up to a cloud storage system so you can access across multiple devices.